Visualization methods for L/I

The following forms of ‘landscape approach’ fitting visualization can be used:

  • Bar diagrams & pie charts – (stacked) Bar diagrams and pie charts are often used to visualize quantities and measurements. They can show amounts in different types, on specific locations, or amounts over time;

bar diagrams & pie charts as a way of visualizing amounts of dredge to be cleaned by a landscape infrastructure.

  • Time-dynamic imaging –  The imaging of (evolutionary-, development-, or cyclic) processes over time.Time change can represented as a range of ‘snapshots’ through time that show several set phases or future time stages of (either spontaneous or co-guided) development, e.g. t=5; t=10; t=20; t=30.Also, dynamic imaging is used to visualize temporal stages of cyclical change, such as daily, seasonal or tidal changes.Last, dynamic imaging can be used to show several stages of landscape performance, such as a water infrastructure showing a dry stage, initial buffer stage, peak buffer stage, and discharge stage.
Time is represented as a range of snapshots over time

Time is represented as a range of snapshots over time

  • Simulations – Imitation of the operation of a real-world process or system over time, for example sand sedimentation pattern simulations that are used to get a feel of how sand-catchment patterns will occur in real-world situations after design intervention. This type of representation is often under-explored as many projects still have a strong focus on visual ‘picture’ representations, but simulation modelling can provide for new and extended possibilities of visual representations.
Simulations as a way of visualizing sand accretion patterns over time

Simulations as a way of visualizing sand accretion patterns over time

  • Timelines – Displaying a list of (future) events or interventions in chronological order. Within a design, timelines can be used both for description of past events, as well as planning future minimal interventions.
Timelines showing processes and minimum interventions over time

Timelines showing processes and minimum interventions over time

  • Flow diagrams – Flow diagrams explain the functioning of a (proposed) system, such as a new water system, the flow of nutrients, etc. They have great potential of giving deeper insight to complex system flows and their quantities.
Flow diagrams here visualize the water flow through a proposed water system and the general nutrient flow of a coastal location

Flow diagrams here visualize the water flow through a proposed water system and the general nutrient flow of a coastal location

  • Succession diagrams – These diagrams are used to understand the succession processes and show the (ecological) successional stages from pioneer to climax situations of dune succession, marsh succession etc.
The succession of a dune from a primary to a climax state

The succession of a dune from a primary to a climax state

  • Collages showing engaged experiences – Collages should not show exclusive perspectival landscapes but ordinary daily landscapes that are experienced on a daily basis. Collages should show users that are engaged and  notice the landscape change as it performs, hereby being educated to understand the functioning and value of these performing landscapes.
Collages showing engaged experiences

Collages showing engaged experiences

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